National Get Outdoors Day

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.” Rachel Carlson On Saturday, June 10th, the Defenders of Wildlife organization will celebrate their 10th annual National Get … Continue reading "National Get Outdoors Day"

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.”

Rachel Carlson

On Saturday, June 10th, the Defenders of Wildlife organization will celebrate their 10th annual National Get Outdoors Day. This national event encourages families to go outside, visit a park or refuge, and renew a personal connection to nature, as well as regenerate a commitment to leaving a healthy planet for future generations. There’s nothing better than introducing your children to the wonders of nature, especially since it’s only a matter of time before the future rests in their hands. Here is a list of all 198 National Get Outdoors Day locations. There might be one near you!

“What do parents owe their young that is more important than a warm and trusting connection to the Earth…?”

– Theodore Roszak, The Voice of the Earth

Every grade level in Oak Meadow’s k-4 coursework suggests environmental awareness activities and exercises. We also feel it’s important to introduce and teach young children about the natural environment. So, go ahead! Make summer plans, get outdoors, and let Nature be your teacher!

“As a child, one has that magical capacity to move among the many eras of the earth; to see the land as an animal does; to experience the sky from the perspective of a flower or a bee; to feel the earth quiver and breathe beneath us; to know a hundred different smells of mud and listen unselfconsciously to the soughing of the trees.”

-Valerie Andrews, A Passion for this Earth

 

A Day to Remember: Memorial Day

Memorial Day, celebrated in the United States on the last Monday of May, is a day in which we honor those men and women (and service dogs) that died while serving the country in the United States armed services.

The day actually started as a way to commemorate those that died during the U.S. Civil War. In 1868 it was established and it was called “Decoration Day.” At that time it was on May 30th and was a day to decorate the graves of those that died in the Civil War.

In 1967 Memorial Day became a national holiday. In 1971 the holiday was moved to the last Monday in May. On the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs website, it states: “In December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed, and the president signed into law, “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance.”

The law actually requires that U.S. citizens pause, for one minute at 3:00 p.m. on Memorial Day, and honor those that have died in service to our country.

 

Where'd Ya See That?

Photo credit: Lucy Enge
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Recently one of my students found it interesting to support her ideas about music by submitting some examples in YouTube videos that she found on the internet. I thought it was a great idea! It can be supportive of your thoughts and opinions in lesson work by including a YouTube video, an Instagram photo or video, a Ted Talk, Tweets, or any other video or photograph from a social media site.

Social Media has a lot to offer in the way of credible information. It may seem like a fun way to spend time for entertainment, but there are also times when a video, a photograph, or something on a social media post can be suitable for a research report or persuasive essay. These types of resources have to be cited in your written work, just as any resource used for research is cited in a bibliography. There is a special MLA form (which Oak Meadow uses) to cite these types of resources.

Based on MLA standards for other media formats, Oak Meadow asks that you use the following format. Make sure you include all the quotation marks, commas, italics, and periods in the proper places.

To cite YouTube videos:

Author’s Name or Poster’s Username. “Title of Video.” Name of Website. Name of Website Publisher, date of posting. Medium. Date retrieved.

Example:

“Lunch Hour NYC: Hot Dog Carts.” New York Public Library, 5 July 2012, www.nypl.org/audiovideo/hot-dog.

To cite an Instagram post:

Account holder’s Last name, First name or Username. “Photo Title or Description.” Instagram, Other contributors, Date photo was published, URL (without http:// or https://).

(If no title is available, create a simple description and do not place it in italics or quotation marks.)

Example:

National Geographic. Photo of Bering Sea. Instagram, photographed by Corey Arnold, 2 Apr. 2017,  www.instagram.com/p/BSaisVuDk7S/?taken-by=natgeo.

To cite an Instagram video: 

Poster’s Last name, First Name or Username. “Video Title.” Instagram, Other contributors, Date published, URL (without http:// or https://).

(If no title is available, create a simple description and do not place it in italics or quotation marks.)

Example:

@itsdougthepug. “I Climb All The Time…Into Bed.” Instagram, April 2, 2017, www.instagram.com/p/BSWo9-0j940/?taken-by=itsdougthepug&hl=en.

To cite a TED Talk:

Cite a TED Talk as you would a lecture:

Author. (Year, Month). Title [Video file]. Retrieved from URL

Cain, Susan. “The Power of Introverts.” TED. Feb. 2012. Lecture.

To cite a Tweet:

Last name, First name (Username). “Tweet Message.” Date posted, Time Posted. Tweet.

Tweet - MLAExample:

Timberlake, Justin (jtimberlake). “USA! USA!!.” 16 June 2014, 8:05 PM. Tweet.

Last name, First name (Username). “Tweet Message.” Date posted, Time Posted. Tweet.

All of the above examples were taken from the EasyBib site: http://www.easybib.com/guides/

If you are looking for a quick guide to help you cite a source, this may be helpful:

http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/how-do-i-cite-a/

National Inventors Month

Every child has a dream, to pursue the dream is in every child’s hand to make it a reality. One’s invention is another’s tool…

– Samuel Morse

National Inventors Month is a month-long event in May that celebrates invention and creativity. The verb, invent, means to be an originator that creates or designs something that has never existed. To invent can also mean to make up a story or idea. There is no doubt that children love to use their imagination and creativity, including inventing things from whatever is in front of them. Thomas Edison once stated: “To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.”

One of Oak Meadow’s final fifth grade science lessons teaches “Technology and Design”. The student is encouraged to creatively problem solve, research inventions, and then design an invention from mainly recycled or repurposed items. The kindergarten through fourth grade coursework also encourages students to construct and create with art materials, natural materials, recycled goods, and toys. It is an important educational tool that applies both the hand and head, helps the students to develop skills that can be applied to future creative problem solving situations, and thus, fosters positive growth and development in a young child.

Many children are even inspired to share their inventions with others. There are several sites that welcome home educators to participate in their programs, activities, and/or special events. Perhaps working on an invention could be a great summer project for your child. Here are some helpful resources for you:

The services of the US Patent Office offer a “kids” link:

Kids Invent! is a great online resource for both educators and homeschoolers.

Invent Help helps young inventors patent and submit their ideas to companies.

If your children are interested in an informative book that provides ideas for inventions, an excellent choice is Kids Inventing! A Handbook for Young Inventors, written by Susan Casey. For those children who are in the beginning stages of learning about the exciting world of inventions, there are several storybooks that may inspire the “inventor” in your child. The “Fatherly” website lists nine books that can be found in most public libraries.

For those children who love to enter contests and competitions, Kid Inventors’ Day provides links to a variety of ongoing contests and competitions.

For a bonus history lesson that may inspire your children’s innovative minds, the article “10 Great Inventions Dreamt Up by Children”, is a great reference source.

INNOVATE YOUR CHILD’S IMAGINATION AND INVENTIVENESS!

YOU MIGHT BE SURPRISED WHERE IT LEADS!

The Night Sky

This week’s night sky
(Northern Hemisphere)

“You cannot teach anybody anything. You can only help them discover it within themselves.” ~~ Galileo ~~ (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642)

I love to go outside on a clear night and observe the stars and planets. Last night the incredibly beautiful full moon was so bright that it was hard to see any constellations! I took a walk in the moonlight and thought about how strong the light from our sun is that our moon can reflect enough light for me to see where I am going at 10:00 at night. Awesome! In the 7th grade science curriculum, Oak Meadow students investigate the moon, its phases, and its gravitational pull on Earth. Students also learn to compare the characteristics of the planets in our solar system. The study of astronomy is so fascinating!

Sky viewing is a great time for gathering friends on an evening and doing some star watching. If you know there will be a clear night for star viewing, it’s a great time to HAVE A STAR PARTY!

Send invitations, make “star” snacks, and put lots of blankets on the ground for friends to sit down on for good viewing. It’s fun to have some binoculars, a telescope, or one of the free astronomy apps available. Make sure you have flashlights for looking at books of constellations!

Some towns have astronomy clubs and the people in the clubs are usually very willing to come join in the fun and help answer star gazing questions. The Astronomical Society of Northern New England can be contacted for Star Parties!

“This Week’s Sky at a Glance” at the Sky and Telescope website is really helpful for learning what is visible in your own evening sky. Check it out for the constellation guide covering the whole evening sky. Observing the night sky is such a fun activity on a sparkling clear night!

Extreme Weather

Here she comes again. April is her name.

One of twelve children, they all call her Rain.

All around the world, weather events are happening in every corner of the globe. In Oak Meadow’s coursework, observing seasonal weather and its effect on plants and animals is a significant part of the kindergarten, first grade and second grade science lessons. In the third grade science curriculum, weather conditions are studied by tracking weather and clouds, learning about lightning and thunder, and engaging in educational activities and artistic exercises in relation to tornadoes, blizzards, and hurricanes (or typhoons). According to econet.com, the definition for extreme weather is weather on a larger, more serious and devastating scale.

For additional information on weather, meteorologist Crystal Wicker created an informational site for children called Weather Wiz Kids. Kids Discover also created an interactive iPad app for kids, which displays the most extreme forms of weather on Earth. It includes an interactive cross-section of a hurricane, HD videos of tornadoes and lightning, and the science behind extreme climates.

In addition to the serious side of extreme weather, you might like to read the book, Thunder Cake, written by Patricia Polacco. It is a heartwarming and beautifully written story about Patricia (the author) when she was a young girl, and how she overcame the fear of storms with the help of her grandmother. You can also introduce some fun ways we use the weather through idioms and phrases, such as under the weather, weather the storm, or fair-weather friends. It might be a great time to include a spelling and vocabulary exercise on the difference between weather, whether and wether.

The wonders of science are wonderful!

 

Knitting with Needles

In through the front door
Running around the back
Out through the window
Off jumps jack.

In the Oak Meadow grade one coursework, knitting with needles is introduced to the students. However, some first graders find it challenging to knit with needles. For the home teacher who is an inexperienced knitter and for students who find it frustrating, the K-4 team of Oak Meadow teachers have offered some suggestions and simple alternatives that will help to meet the “heart” of the activity.

Meg Minehan: My suggestions are to first try finger knitting, the knitting mushroom, or the wooden knitting star. My children loved those “tools”, and the process was simple, repetitive and soothing (just like knitting should be). ​For what it’s worth, my son, Ian, didn’t really take to knitting when it was initially introduced in first grade. However, he picked it up again this year (at age 9) and loved it.

Michelle Menegaz: I agree that teaching knitting as an inexperienced teacher can be challenging. I suggest offering the “pre-knitting” activities and really encourage the home teacher to find a knitter to help them, if possible. Also, Sunny’s Mittens is a great book with a story that contains knitting directions right in the events of the tale. I would read a bit of this and knit along with the story. The child would also knit along, if interested. We would read a bit, knit a bit, stop and get our knitting sorted or show what the written directions in the story meant. Very satisfying!

Photo Credit: Brandaw Family (Oak Meadow Archives)

Lesley Arnold: I highly recommend the DVD, The Art of Knitting 4 Kids  If a tutor isn’t available for knitting, then this video is great! Be sure to also check your library, for many libraries have knitting clubs.

Leslie Daniels: Another site that I absolutely adore and share with my Oak Meadow families is called “Knitted Bliss“. It includes story books to inspire future knitters for three different age groups: ages 2-4, ages 4-6 and ages 6-9. The title of each book is a joy in itself!

Meg Minehan: Shall I Knit You a Hat is one of our favorite Christmas books for 6-9 year olds!

Andy Kilroy: My friend Clare, a long-time kindergarten teacher, loves to take yarn into her classroom and just let her kids play with the yarn – wrap it, wind it, tie bows with it, braid it, touch it – just to get the feel of fabric/yarn in their skin. Then when it comes time to knit, they already have the awareness of yarn as a material. I taught my granddaughter to finger knit the other day (she had never done it), and she is very excited at all the possibilities that opened for her! Long live fiber arts – let’s not give up on them!

Anna Logowitz: My micro-schoolers have gotten a great start by making their own knitting needles. They sanded chopsticks smooth and glued wooden beads to the ends: nice and simple. It gives them a sense of ownership over their work before they begin knitting that, so far, seems to be increasing their frustration tolerance, too!

Photo Credit: Estelle Giannakopoulos

Seed Sprouting Suggestions

In the Oak Meadow course books, growing seeds and rooting plants are two of the science projects offered in the lesson plans. Sometimes, due to external variables, experiments are not always successful; and observing no changes can certainly lead to the disappointment of an innocent, wide-eyed, hopeful child. In the kindergarten and third grade coursework, rooting an avocado pit and sprouting a sweet potato are suggested science experiments. Several of the Oak Meadow K-8 teachers provided helpful hints for more successful results, along with alternative activities to try:

Sarah Antel: The sweet potato must be organic as standard sweets are sprayed with something to prevent sprouting.

Andy Kilroy: You know what works well – a regular white potato put into a pot of dirt. I always plant one on St. Patrick’s Day (old Irish superstition) and it always comes up with beautiful green leaves. The home teacher will need to buy the potato a month before they want to plant it so it can start eyeing out. The avocado will grow again if you put it in dirt. Somehow the dirt seems to be the key, but again, you must leave it plenty of time. Avocados are sensitive and dry out and can die quickly, if not enough water is applied. I did both projects with my granddaughter last year and she loved it – especially when we dug up the tiny taters and ate them for lunch (takes about six weeks). Also mung beans!! You can get those any time in a good farmer’s supply store, wet them, put them in a mason jar under the sink and wait for a couple of days. We did this all the time when my kids were little to have bean sprouts in our stir fry. Alfalfa works, too.

Leslie Daniels: I’ve planted sweet potatoes in garden pots. The student may not be able to view the root growth, but the vines are SO pretty! I have also suggested sprouting wheat berries. The roots and sprouts are fun to watch grow, because it is a speedy process, and they are wonderful edibles, too.

Meg Minehan: My kids also do soil sprouts  http://www.thedailygardener.com/sprout-kits/

We use sunflower, radish, buckwheat, peas… they are fun and really tasty. This is a great time of year for them, too.

Michelle Menegaz: I remember as a kid being totally fascinated with the greens that eventually shoot out of the top cut off a carrot when it is placed in a shallow dish of water.

Lesley Arnold: Me too! I loved watching that carrot top sprout. When I was student teaching in a kindergarten…40 some years ago…the teacher had put bricks into water (about half way up the sides) and sprinkled wheat berries on top. The bricks sprouted greens! (Maybe a precursor to chia pets?)

Dr. Seuss Day

The more that you read, the more things you will know.

The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.

Dr. Seuss

Curling up with a good book and reading a story with children is often considered a family’s favorite pastime. Whether it is a picture book for the younger child or a chapter book for a more advanced reader, sharing stories is not only a delightful experience but also aids in the development of independent reading.

For the young child, rhyme and repetition are the precursors for early literacy and reading readiness. In the Oak Meadow kindergarten and first grade coursework, the practice of rhyme and repetition are emphasized as critical skills in the preparation of reading. The student is encouraged to listen to books with repeated phrases, along with listening to and reciting short rhyming poems, verses and tongue twisters. The student is also encouraged to retell stories, as well as act out stories with puppets and other props. Oftentimes a child will even imitate what the parent has read by pretending to read books, which can also aid in the development of memorization. These types of activities provide the child with a sense of mastery and accomplishment, which naturally enhances the joy of literacy and the desire for reading.

A favorite American children’s author, illustrator, and co-founder of Beginner Books is Dr. Seuss. March 2 marks his 113th birthday and is now celebrated as Dr. Seuss Day. Did you know his real name is Theodor Seuss Geisel, but he used the pen name Dr. Seuss? Did you know his very first book (published in 1938), And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, was rejected by the first forty-three publishers he showed it to? Since that time, forty-four of Dr. Seuss’s children’s books filled with zany rhymes and repetition have been published and are now available worldwide.

It’s a good week to visit the library and enjoy perusing the classics of Dr. Seuss. You might also like to visit Seussville or have fun testing your knowledge with the following Dr. Seuss book trivia quizzes:

https://www.familyeducation.com/quizzes/dr-seuss/dr-seusss-books

https://www.familyeducation.com/quizzes/dr-seuss/dr-seuss-book-trivia

My favorite Dr. Seuss book is The Cat in the Hat Comes Back. Which one is your favorite?

Snow!

“Under the microscope, I found that snowflakes were miracles of beauty; and it seemed a shame that this beauty should not be seen and appreciated by others. Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost. Just that much beauty was gone, without leaving any record behind.” Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley 1925

One of my favorite stories to share with children during the winter is Else Beskow’s book, Ollie’s Ski Trip. Ollie goes on a snowy adventure and discovers King Winter’s palace where he finds him sitting on his icy throne with sheer pride and pleasure. Ollie also meets King Winter’s spritely right hand man, Jack Frost, as well as Mrs. Thaw, who shows up with her broom to sweep away the last of the winter snow in preparation for the entrance of Lady Spring.

The season of winter goes hand in hand with the wonder of snow, which brings to mind a man by the name of Wilson Bentley, better known as the Snowflake Man. Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley was a farmer who grew up and lived in Vermont. As a young boy, he was home schooled. He had a natural affinity with nature, and with snowflakes in particular. He received his first microscope on his 15th birthday (in 1881) and began examining snowflakes. He soon discovered that no snowflake is like any other. At the age of 19, Bentley took his first micro-photograph of a snowflake, and this was the beginning of a passionate hobby. He spent his entire adult life photographing snowflakes, and by the time he died in 1931, he had photographed over 5,000 images. Imagine that!

William Bentley’s official home site also provides an assortment of books for all ages on this marvelous “Snowflake Man”. If you are fortunate to live close to or pass by Jericho, Vermont, you can visit the Bentley Museum to view his photographed snowflakes and to learn more about his fascinating life and the captivating beauty of snow!

The Oak Meadow syllabus in kindergarten and in first grade offers the artistic project of making paper snowflake designs. Oak Meadow’s fourth grade coursework offers a block on poetry, which involves creating a portfolio of freestyle, rhyming and acrostic poems. Student Maren Doughty wrote a lovely acrostic poem on “SNOWFLAKES”…

Smelling hot chocolate
Now winter is here
Outside we go!
Wind howling
Freezing fingers and noses
Lots of snow angels shaped in the snow
All the gournd is covered white
Kids building snowman
Everyone is excited
Seeing snowflakes falling