The Plagiarism Sea!

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This blog post is brought to you by our Oak Meadow teacher, Michelle Menegaz. I think you’ll enjoy it!

Hello Middle Schoolers!

This is a very important alert about the shark-infested waters of the Plagiarism Sea into which many middle school students dive at one time or another. It always starts out as a search for treasure…the quick path to a wonderfully phrased and well-edited essay or report, but quite soon, the unsuspecting student becomes tangled in strands of broken copyright seaweed and the sharks begin to circle!

From Smithsonian Magazine

As an Oak Meadow teacher, I often notice that some of a student’s writing is almost word for word the same as parts of material in the sources used. (This, by the way, is one of the reasons for including citations for all sources. If no sources are cited, I can not be sure the work is original.) It’s really important that you always write in your own words and not copy sentences or paragraphs from other sources. Copying from other sources is considered cheating, and is taken very seriously at Oak Meadow. The first time it happens teachers give a warning, and if it happens again, it will more seriously affect grades.

Please take time to read more in the Oak Meadow Parent Handbook in the section called “Original Work Guidelines.” This can go a long way towards ensuring that you avoid the weeds and sharks on the way to the true treasure…an original, well-crafted piece of writing or research. I can also recommend the Purdue OWL website. It has some very good content that you could use.

Plagiarism is a very tricky thing to define at times, since excessive paraphrasing can also be considered copying of a sort. There is definitely a learning curve about plagiarism in all its forms, especially with use of the internet. There are many reasons that students plagiarize their work. Using three reliable sources at all times and taking very brief notes from these sources can be enormously helpful. Another possible path to try would be to do the work in your own handwriting, in your own words of course, so there are not cut and paste errors.

It is extremely time consuming for an Oak meadow teacher to verify plagiarized work. Once the first warning is given, any further work that is plagiarized will need to receive a failing grade. Let’s avoid this!

In summary, here is what to do:

*Review the Original Work Guidelines in the Oak Meadow Parent Handbook

*Read the bibliography piece called Citing Your Sources

*Discuss with your parents how to use your own words

Warmly,

Michelle Menegaz, Oak Meadow teacher

 

THE AUGUST ECLIPSE!!

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Hello! Here in New England we have had a good summer and it isn’t over yet! There are still weeks to go in August of lazy summer days and cool nights. Here at Oak Meadow one event we are all looking forward to is the upcoming eclipse on August 21, 2017. The following is a quick blast of great information from DeeDee Hughes, our Oak Meadow colleague:

Hi Folks,

We are all a little eclipse-crazy here in Corvallis, Oregon since we are in the “zone of totality” for viewing the total solar eclipse on August 21. I did some research and found this cool interactive map that shows the path of eclipses for years to come. I found a page where you can type in a city name and see what the eclipse will look like from there–I couldn’t resist checking out where friends and family members live. It’s fun to compare different places:  

Brattleboro VT

Santa Cruz CA

Corvallis OR

Seems like everyone in the country will be seeing something cool. Oh, and this article has good info about the solar eclipse glasses and how to tell if you have safe ones. 

I was wondering why the upcoming eclipse is being called “Eclipse of the Century” when they happen all the time, so I dug deeper. A total solar eclipse is different than an annular eclipse, but both have the moon lined up exactly in between Earth and the sun. In an annular eclipse, the moon moves fully in front of the sun but because the moon is further from the Earth at that time, there will be a “ring of fire” seen around the moon, rather than having the moon block the sun entirely the way it does in a total solar eclipse. The difference between an annular and a total solar eclipse is the distance between the moon and Earth. Here’s an article with a cool “ring of fire” photo. 

That’s my two cents on cool eclipse fun! DD

I’ll also add that EARTHSKY has a very good “Eclipse Day” checklist for getting ready for viewing. Be prepared, have fun, and enjoy the “Eclipse of the Century” with family and friends!

 

Stamp Collecting!

“The word ‘philatelist’ means a person who practices philately or stamp collecting. It comes from the French word ‘philatelie’, which was derived from the Greek words ‘philos’, meaning loving, and ‘atelia’, meaning exemption from tax which also came to mean ‘postage is prepaid.’.”

American Philatelic Society

The American Philatelic Society is the largest, nonprofit organization in the world for stamp collectors.

When I was little and traveled with my family, we didn’t have computers for emailing and so we wrote lots of letters to family and friends. We also made a tradition of mailing ourselves letters to our own home! We would go to a post office in a country or town that we were visiting, and purchase a special stamp. (You can ask the post master to show you what stamps he/she has available.) Then, using the stamp, we would mail the letter home to ourselves. It was fun to see the letters and the stamps when we arrived home. I don’t have a very big collection of stamps, but the ones that I do have hold some wonderful memories for me.

This year a really cool stamp is going to be offered! A first of its kind! Some background first:

You may have read that there is going to be a total eclipse of the sun across the United States this summer. (Monday, August 21, 2017.) People from all over the world will be coming to different spots in the United States to witness this solar eclipse.

Solar Eclipse
Photo Credit: Public Domain

What does a solar eclipse have to do with a stamp? Well, the Postal Service will be offering a first-of-its-kind stamp! It changes when you touch it! The Postal Service announcement says: “The Total Eclipse of the Sun, Forever® stamp, which commemorates the August 21 eclipse, transforms into an image of the Moon from the heat of a finger.”

You can read the story of how the stamp was designed here.

If you would like to view other stamps that have commemorated eclipses, you can view them here.

So, as you travel to new places, or even stay in your hometown, take a look at the many stamps that the post office has to offer!

P. S.  Looking directly at the sun during a solar eclipse can be dangerous; here’s a way to enjoy the eclipse without hurting your eyes: http://hilaroad.com/camp/projects/eclipse_viewer/eclipse_viewer.html

 

Where'd Ya See That?

Photo credit: Lucy Enge
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Recently one of my students found it interesting to support her ideas about music by submitting some examples in YouTube videos that she found on the internet. I thought it was a great idea! It can be supportive of your thoughts and opinions in lesson work by including a YouTube video, an Instagram photo or video, a Ted Talk, Tweets, or any other video or photograph from a social media site.

Social Media has a lot to offer in the way of credible information. It may seem like a fun way to spend time for entertainment, but there are also times when a video, a photograph, or something on a social media post can be suitable for a research report or persuasive essay. These types of resources have to be cited in your written work, just as any resource used for research is cited in a bibliography. There is a special MLA form (which Oak Meadow uses) to cite these types of resources.

Based on MLA standards for other media formats, Oak Meadow asks that you use the following format. Make sure you include all the quotation marks, commas, italics, and periods in the proper places.

To cite YouTube videos:

Author’s Name or Poster’s Username. “Title of Video.” Name of Website. Name of Website Publisher, date of posting. Medium. Date retrieved.

Example:

“Lunch Hour NYC: Hot Dog Carts.” New York Public Library, 5 July 2012, www.nypl.org/audiovideo/hot-dog.

To cite an Instagram post:

Account holder’s Last name, First name or Username. “Photo Title or Description.” Instagram, Other contributors, Date photo was published, URL (without http:// or https://).

(If no title is available, create a simple description and do not place it in italics or quotation marks.)

Example:

National Geographic. Photo of Bering Sea. Instagram, photographed by Corey Arnold, 2 Apr. 2017,  www.instagram.com/p/BSaisVuDk7S/?taken-by=natgeo.

To cite an Instagram video: 

Poster’s Last name, First Name or Username. “Video Title.” Instagram, Other contributors, Date published, URL (without http:// or https://).

(If no title is available, create a simple description and do not place it in italics or quotation marks.)

Example:

@itsdougthepug. “I Climb All The Time…Into Bed.” Instagram, April 2, 2017, www.instagram.com/p/BSWo9-0j940/?taken-by=itsdougthepug&hl=en.

To cite a TED Talk:

Cite a TED Talk as you would a lecture:

Author. (Year, Month). Title [Video file]. Retrieved from URL

Cain, Susan. “The Power of Introverts.” TED. Feb. 2012. Lecture.

To cite a Tweet:

Last name, First name (Username). “Tweet Message.” Date posted, Time Posted. Tweet.

Tweet - MLAExample:

Timberlake, Justin (jtimberlake). “USA! USA!!.” 16 June 2014, 8:05 PM. Tweet.

Last name, First name (Username). “Tweet Message.” Date posted, Time Posted. Tweet.

All of the above examples were taken from the EasyBib site: http://www.easybib.com/guides/

If you are looking for a quick guide to help you cite a source, this may be helpful:

http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/how-do-i-cite-a/

Great idea!

Benjamin Franklin
Photo Credit: Public Domain

My father is about to turn 94 and consequently, we go all out for his birthday parties! We have a tradition of having him tell us what he was doing at the present age of each member of the family. This past year the youngest among us was a great grandson just 13 months old. It was fun to hear my father speak about what he was doing when he was 13 months old. The oldest at the party was 68 years and that too was amusing!

We decided this year to list many of the things that had been invented in the years since our father (grandfather or great grandfather) was born. Each family member brought a description of the invention to the party. Wow! He has certainly seen many, many inventions in his lifetime!

Photo Credit: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. (Public Domain)

I think we take for granted some of the inventions he saw in his lifetime, such as the color TV or the black box flight recorder. Lithium batteries and the pocket calculator surprised all of us as just being invented in the 1970s.

Not only do I think we take these inventions for granted, but I think we also pay little attention to the people that invented them! Physicists, biologists, chemists, carpenters, farmers–you name it and you may find a profession that has an inventor. Where do these inventors come from? “From 1900 onwards, on average about 10% of Americans have been first-generation immigrants. Yet first-generation immigrants have won 33% of all American Nobel prizes in the sciences since the award began in 1900, representing thirty-five countries from six continents.” (https://m.facebook.com/notes/neil-degrasse-tyson/science-in-america/10155202535296613/)

All this talk about past inventions got me wondering what is being invented (and patented) right now! I found out about The Lemelson-MIT Program which strives to celebrate  “outstanding inventors and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention.” It is so interesting to read about the most recent inventions that are being awarded!

Do you have something that you are working on that will one day be an invention that will benefit us all? Join an inventor’s club! Here’s a list of them by state: http://www.freeinventorshelp.com/Organizations.html#states

Good luck!

Sound Waves and Sonic Booms

Why am I playing a Pink Floyd album as I write my blog? Well, I just couldn’t resist after reading about the newly found shrimp that is named after the band! The legend goes that Pink Floyd once played their music so loudly at a concert that the sound waves killed the fish in a nearby pond.

anothershrimpinthewall-fullres by katepocklington.jpeg

The shrimp has a very large pink colored front claw that it uses to kill its prey. It uses the claw by snapping the pink claw and creating a sound so loud that it can kill small fish. So the scientists (Sammy De Grave of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Arthur Anker of the Universidade Federal de Goiás in Brazil and Kristin Hultgren of Seattle University) thought it would be a great honor to name the new species of shrimp “Synalpheus Pinkfloydi” after the band Pink Floyd!

A cartoon version of the Pink Floyd pistol shrimp is shown in this handout photo. (Chris Jarvis / Oxford University Museum of Natural History)

This little shrimp creates volumes of sound up to 210 decibels! If you are in the 8th grade physics course with Oak Meadow,  you study sound waves, sound pressure, and sound power and the impact they have on wildlife and humans. You will also study decibels, the speed of sound, and the way sound travels. So when I write that the sound created by the snapping of the claw can reach 210 decibels, you know THAT IS LOUD!!!

Read more about this fascinating discovery here.

 

 

 

Fact or Opinion?

The Oak Meadow curriculum offers many opportunities to learn how to research and write reports. Note that I wrote LEARN, because most middle school students are just beginning to learn how to find appropriate resources for a topic and how to organize the information into an interesting, cohesive, and fact-filled report.

Finding a reliable source can begin with a trip to the library for magazines, encyclopedias, newspapers, biographies, and lots more! Some students don’t have a library nearby and so they use the internet for their research. Reliable sites are usually ones that end in .org, .net, or .edu. I like to use the Great Websites for Kids as a starting point. Their website notes that the site is an “Internet guide of child-safe sites selected by a committee of the American Library Association.” You can choose a subject such as “sciences” and then choose a specific subject of interest. Give it a try!

There’s a lot in the news these days about what is fact and what is opinion. When I read reports by students I often write, “Make sure you back up your opinion with a reliable source that explains the facts that you are basing your opinion on.” Some students are learning that an opinion can be based on fact, and they’re backing it up with a quotation from a reliable source. For instance, I received a research report on sound frequencies for an 8th grade physics lesson. I was impressed with the three sources and the examples that the student used for his research. However, most impressive was the use of quotations from his sources that added strength to his examples. Convincing a reader that what you’ve written is true, rather than just your opinion, is pretty important! When you use a quote from a reliable source you give your opinion validity. It allows the reader to trust that your opinion is based on fact.

Making facts louder than opinions is evident in this video from The Weather Channel. 

Water, Air, and Wind

images-1At this time of the year here in New England we are in our winter months. As the temperatures hover below freezing, we do all we can to keep warm.

The temperature of the oceans, the air, and also the wind patterns of the planet all create climate. In the Oak Meadow 7th grade science curriculum you study about climate, weather patterns, and global winds. You learn the relationship between air masses and weather. You become a meteorologist! Collecting weather data is one job of a meteorologist, so students using the curriculum set up their own weather station, keep records over a 5 day period, and report their data. Looking at the past data and the present data allows meteorologists to predict the weather of the future.

Today some scientists are collecting data about the Arctic sea and the Antarctic sea. Scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center study the CRYOSPHERE, or more simply, they study the cold places on our planet. They study glaciers, snow, sea ice and specifically the areas around the North and South poles. In their studies of these areas, scientists have recorded warmer temperatures of the seas and the air. Those records provide data for the scientists to measure how much sea ice is disappearing. Just as 7th grade students record their own weather data and make predictions, these scientists gather data to report the impact the state of the cryosphere has on the planet. That means that they are able to report and predict weather patterns on the Earth. With warmer temperatures of water and air recorded, scientists are able to warn us of future climatic changes.

In the Oak Meadow science curriculum, you learn that ozone depletion, the thinning of the stratospheric ozone, contributes to global warming.

“How much can a single person affect Earth’s changing climate? According to researchers in the United States and Germany, 3 square meters of summer sea ice disappear in the Arctic for every metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) that a person directly or indirectly produces. How can one person produce 1 metric ton of CO2? That’s about a roundtrip flight from New York to Europe per passenger. Or, a 4,000-kilometer car ride.” https://nsidc.org/news/newsroom/us-and-german-researchers-calculate-individual-contribution-climate-change

The Oak Meadow science curriculum across the grades has assignments in which students consider how to limit, or reduce, their impact on the ozone, and how the ozone can be preserved. If you are a student, or family, looking for suggestions on how to reduce your impact, read this.

 

What's In the News?

images

“Pakistan’s Malala Yousafzai and India’s Kailash Satyarthi

Win Nobel Peace Prize”

“A Peek Inside The World’s First Carbon Neutral City”

“Google’s Young Scientists Are Out To Change The World”

These intriguing news headlines come from a news source called DOGO News

In the Oak Meadow social studies curriculum, you will most certainly come across an assignment that requires current event articles from a news source. If you don’t have access to newspapers or magazines in your area and there isn’t a library near you, it may be a challenge to find local current event news articles, and a greater challenge to find articles about events that are international. DOGO News has terrific and interesting articles for kids on current events taking place over the world. They cover many subjects like science, sports, and health, and there are also lots of videos and games.

The Smithsonian Tween Tribune is another great source! It has daily news for kids grades 5-8. You will find articles for your specific grade level with photos, graphics, and audio and/or video materials prepared by the Smithsonian. There is so much to learn about history, and the arts, science, and culture of countries around the world.

Check this out from DOGO News: Nations Come Together

An Oak Meadow Homeroom!

If you are enrolled in the Oak Meadow 7th or 8th grade and you have an Oak Meadow email address,  you can join the Oak Meadow Homeroom Group.

A “homeroom” is a place where students in schools gather together before school starts to share ideas, have conversations about the day or a specific subject, and basically check in with each other.  Since at Oak Meadow we don’t have an actual place for middle school students to gather, and our students all over the world are waking up at different times and studying at different times, that makes it a challenge to gather together. Still, the teachers really wanted to form a group that might serve the same purpose even without an actual room. Thanks to the internet, we can do this!

If you’ve received your Oak Meadow email address, you’ve noticed that you can share emails with other students in the group. One conversation is about where they live and why they are homeschooled. One is enjoying talking about their pets. Another conversation has been suggesting good books they’ve read. These are books they’ve been reading for pure pleasure. I’ve posted the titles here so that you might try some of their favorites.

Thanks so much to all for your contributions of good books and if you haven’t joined the Homeroom yet, give it a try! It’s fun!

These are their favorite books so far. They’re not in any special order:

Series they like:

Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

Land of Stories by Chris Colfer

Heroes of Olympus by Rick Riordan

The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare

Books they like:

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper

Counting by 7’s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard by Rick Riordan

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling

The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shulman