THE AUGUST ECLIPSE!!

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Hello! Here in New England we have had a good summer and it isn’t over yet! There are still weeks to go in August of lazy summer days and cool nights. Here at Oak Meadow one event we are all looking forward to is the upcoming eclipse on August 21, 2017. The following is a quick blast of great information from DeeDee Hughes, our Oak Meadow colleague:

Hi Folks,

We are all a little eclipse-crazy here in Corvallis, Oregon since we are in the “zone of totality” for viewing the total solar eclipse on August 21. I did some research and found this cool interactive map that shows the path of eclipses for years to come. I found a page where you can type in a city name and see what the eclipse will look like from there–I couldn’t resist checking out where friends and family members live. It’s fun to compare different places:  

Brattleboro VT

Santa Cruz CA

Corvallis OR

Seems like everyone in the country will be seeing something cool. Oh, and this article has good info about the solar eclipse glasses and how to tell if you have safe ones. 

I was wondering why the upcoming eclipse is being called “Eclipse of the Century” when they happen all the time, so I dug deeper. A total solar eclipse is different than an annular eclipse, but both have the moon lined up exactly in between Earth and the sun. In an annular eclipse, the moon moves fully in front of the sun but because the moon is further from the Earth at that time, there will be a “ring of fire” seen around the moon, rather than having the moon block the sun entirely the way it does in a total solar eclipse. The difference between an annular and a total solar eclipse is the distance between the moon and Earth. Here’s an article with a cool “ring of fire” photo. 

That’s my two cents on cool eclipse fun! DD

I’ll also add that EARTHSKY has a very good “Eclipse Day” checklist for getting ready for viewing. Be prepared, have fun, and enjoy the “Eclipse of the Century” with family and friends!

 

Exploring Ornithology: A Week on Hog Island

by Fianna Wilde, senior at Oak Meadow School

During this past summer, my sister Blythe and I attended a week-long teen birding camp on Hog Island, Maine. The Hog Island Camp, run by the National Audubon Society, is now in its 80th year of existence.

Photo Credit: Fianna Wilde
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Having applied for and received scholarships to attend, we joined 22 other teens to learn about everything from bird banding to seabird restoration. In the sport of birding there are few young people, so spending time with other fledgling birders was particularly special.

Not only was this our first camp away from home, it was also our first time birding on the East Coast. Other campers were endlessly helpful with identification, and everyone was so willing to share their knowledge.

Photo Credit: Fianna Wilde
(Oak Meadow Archives)

We designed an advanced study project (ASP) through Oak Meadow about our explorations in ornithology, and our trip to Hog Island was a part of that adventure. Being able to pursue my dreams and incorporate them into my high school experience is one of the reasons I find Oak Meadow extremely special.

A Day on Hog Island…

4:00 a.m. Get up and out of bed, having awoken long before, unable to sleep because of the excitement of unknown birds singing and the lobster boats motoring around checking pots.

4:30 a.m. Out the door and down the creaky wooden stairs of Crow’s Nest cabin to meet up for a bird walk or thrush banding with Scott Weidensaul (program director) and a few other souls.

7:00 a.m. Breakfast, finally!

Photo Credit: Fianna Wilde
(Oak Meadow Archives)

The weather held, and we motored out aboard Snowgoose III on an all day trip to Eastern Egg Rock. Common tern chicks hatching, Atlantic puffins feeding, and painting the five research interns’ shelter on the island while being dive bombed by a tern parent are memories I will never forget.  

12:00 p.m. Lunch  

Off to a bird banding workshop, or an intro to recording bird song, or drawing with the resident artist.

6:00 p.m. A delicious dinner.

7:30 p.m. Nightly presentation by someone highly regarded in his or her field; tonight it was Stephen Kress, author of Project Puffin and director of the Sea Bird Restoration Program that brought puffins back to Eastern Egg Rock.   

Photo Credit: Fianna Wilde
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Then teen campers known as the Corvids met to discuss the day, do activities, and enjoy bonding time.

Bed? Not quite.

Owling with Josh Potter (teen camp leader), moon and star gazing, and then journaling time.

10:30 p.m. Heather (teen camp leader) singing and playing her guitar as the campers fell asleep, to do it all again tomorrow. Paradise!    

Hog Island, Maine is an incredible place with remarkable people. The National Audubon Society camp I attended, Coastal Marine Bird Studies for Teens, would be an excellent camp for teens with a strong interest in birds, hands-on learning and a love of nature. Hog Island hosts camps for those interested in other aspects of birds, including drawing and photography or a wish to learn more about nature. Explore the Hog Island website (http://hogisland.audubon.org) to find out more.

Photo Credit: Fianna Wilde
(Oak Meadow Archives)

______________________________________________________________

Author Fianna Wilde is a senior at Oak Meadow High School. “Since I can remember, I have loved all aspects of nature. My sister Blythe, also a senior at Oak Meadow, and I used to have lunch with all of the bugs we found around our yard. Two years ago my family moved to Morro Bay, California, and that is where my love of birds took flight. From then on, birding evolved from a pastime to a passion. “

Summer “Days Off” DO Count!

by Deb Velto, K8 Program Director, Oak Meadow School

Summer is a time for rest and rejuvenation, and a time when our schedules often switch from education to relaxation, as families embark on vacations and other fun activities. Some parents wonder if taking a break from academics will cause a gap in their child’s learning. Going on an adventure, whether it’s a local day trip or a week-long vacation, is full of healthy, unstructured opportunities to practice existing skills and build new ones in an informal and fun context. Here are some ways to encourage continued learning while you’re enjoying summer adventures.

Plan it

Photo Credit: Cindie Young (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credit: Cindie Young
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Where will you go on your adventure? Why does this place feel important to your family to visit? How will you get there, what will you do when you are there, and what will it cost? Do some research to find out some interesting facts about your destination. Learn about its history and cultural significance. Together, find out about its natural resources or key features of the local landscape, and then have each family member choose one thing to see or do. Even if you can’t do everything, getting the whole family involved in the planning stages lets children flex important brain muscles. What can you learn about this place before you go that will help you appreciate it more when you are there,

Get ready for it

Give children the opportunity to get ready for the trip on their own. What will they bring? How will they pack? If these skills are already a habit for them, perhaps they could help get a younger sibling ready with the items they need, or help gather the items that the family will need as a whole. Involve your child with making shopping or packing lists. Is any special equipment needed on your adventure? If you are going away for several days or more, how do you prepare your home before such a trip?

Map it

Photo Credit: The Moreland Family (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credit: The Moreland Family
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Use an atlas or other map to plan your trip. Where will you stop for breaks? How long will it take? What cities or towns will you drive through? Are there places of interest that you would like to see? Make a copy of the map and trace your route with a marker or highlighter. Depending on the size of your family, you might need two or three maps. If your child asks, “Are we there yet?” ask them instead, “Where are we now? How far do we have yet to go?”

 

Talk about it

Many students today are lacking practice with oral communication. The availability of email and texting has reduced the frequency that people communicate through speaking. Days off provide a great opportunity to talk with each other. Travel by car, train, airplane, or boat offers endless hours to talk about plans, experiences, memories, literature, goals, and life in general. Once you arrive at your destination, encourage your children to ask questions. They may enjoy calling up a grandparent or friend and tell them all about your trip once you get home.

Pay for it

Vacations can be a perfect time to practice money skills, when the moment comes to buy food or souvenirs on your journey. Have a younger child practice making change or counting money at a store. Older children might be encouraged to budget a larger amount of money ahead of time for the whole trip and make choices about what they purchase. Offer them the opportunity to interact with the cashier on behalf of the family, growing confidence and social skills while practicing math.

Write about it

Create a family trip journal! Get a blank sketch book to pass around during your travels. It can be a great way to pass the time in the car or pull it out for some relaxed down time once you get where you are going. Draw pictures, tape in small artifacts, and write about your trip together. You will end up with a great keepsake from your trip!

Photograph it

Photo Credit: Adam Hall (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credit: Adam Hall
(Oak Meadow Archives)

Bring a camera along to document your experiences. Print the pictures once you get home and create a memory book, or add them to your family trip journal. Arrange the pictures chronologically and write captions so you won’t forget the details. Such books are treasures and can be used as a prompt to tell the story of the day over and over. Older children might enjoy making a slideshow or photo montage of the trip.

Collect it

Vacations can be fun times to collect natural materials or artifacts that might not be available at other times of the year. Bring home some shells, pretty stones, or sea glass from the beach, or some flowers from a hike that can be pressed in your journal. Then, in the winter, pull out these summer reminders to help create holiday gifts or use for other crafts and art projects.

Remember it

Practice storytelling and memory recall skills by bringing out mementos to show friends and family once you are home again. Use your family trip journal or photo memory book to remind you of fun stories that are worth telling and retelling.

Summer is a welcome break for everyone, and it can also be a time for learning opportunities hidden within a great adventure. So don’t worry that your “break” will lead to a loss of learning, but instead embrace the chance to watch your child grow through the free-spirited atmosphere that summer provides.

Summertime Poetry Challenge!

A Summer Challenge! (For my Northern Hemisphere Friends!)

When I was in kindergarten, my school had one requirement in order to move on to first grade. Each child had to memorize ten nursery rhymes before “graduating” from kindergarten! I recall that this wasn’t such a hard thing for me to do since I delighted in the joy and rhythm of the nursery rhymes. Little did I know that not only was I enjoying the beautiful rhythmical patterns, but I was also building my memorization skills, my vocabulary, and my language comprehension skills at a very young age.

Memorizing a poem can just be so satisfying! The poem’s lines can come to you when you least expect it. Just this spring I saw a group of daffodils and the lines of William Wordsworth’s poem, “I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud” sprang into my mind:

“I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze”

And truly, when geese fly overhead in the autumn at my house, I quickly say the first lines of Rachel Field’s poem “Something Told The Wild Geese”:

Something told the wild geese
It was time to go,
Though the fields lay golden
Something whispered, “snow.”

This summer, why not challenge yourself to memorize at least 6 poems? (You might also enjoy memorizing the lyrics to favorite songs!) You can choose some of your own liking, or try the ones listed on the Mensa For Kids website. There are 12 poems listed there and each one has an explanation of the idea of the poem, definition of specific vocabulary words in the poem, and then great ideas to help you memorize the poem more easily.

Summertime!

Photo Credits: Grim Family (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credits: Grim Family (Oak Meadow Archives)

Summer is officially here! For most Oak Meadow families, it is the time when the school year has come to its completion. As we begin the new season without a prescribed daily lesson plan, we begin to wonder about the activities in which we should engage our children. Should we keep up the academics for fear they will forget much of what they learned? Or should this time be a true school break for our children? I would like to share with you some thoughts on what I feel is the true purpose of a summer break.

Life offers us many experiences through our minds and our bodies. We dive in, immerse ourselves, and engage with our hands, head, and heart. Most importantly, life offers us an opportunity to learn about balance. During the school year, we have placed much emphasis on developing skills in focusing, processing, developing and learning. For many of us, this has meant spending several hours each day with our children engaged in the Oak Meadow coursework. For others, the school year has been an opportunity to develop a schedule conducive to our children’s individual learning styles. Whatever the method that’s used, the enrollment period has been about completing the required schoolwork. In other words, a certain focus, process and relationship has been maintained. 

Photo Credit: Newbold Family (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credit: Newbold Family (Oak Meadow Archives)

Summer is a time to take a break from this structured focus. It is a time for the child-initiated, non-academic type of exploration and discovery. Since children naturally desire to grow, a significant amount of learning will continue to go on; however, the subject matter will be different. Summer may be the time that your child will learn to swim, ride a bike, build a fort, or learn five new bird calls. Summer is an expansive time when children have an opportunity for an unscheduled, unhurried learning experience.

Summer is an opportunity for children to assimilate the information they have been working on throughout the school year. Factual learning can sometimes provide stress to the body and to the mind. In order for learning to really take hold, a child needs to have ample opportunity to reside in an environment that is stress free. Children need to have a lot of time to play, to create, and to imagine. 

Summer also provides an opportunity to do all the things we wanted to do with our children during the school year, but just didn’t have the time in our schedule. Summer is our chance to relate even more deeply and warmly with our children and to nurture the love we share. Just as importantly, summer is an opportunity for home teachers to take time off from teaching. Burnout can be a real factor in homeschooling and every home teacher needs to have some time to pursue personal interests that rejuvenate the spirit.

Photo Credits: Massei Family (Oak Meadow Archives)
Photo Credits: Massei Family (Oak Meadow Archives)

The learning that takes place during this period of relaxation is as important as the multiplication tables, spelling and history. Often children will have a growth spurt during this period and are able to return to their structured schoolwork in the fall feeling refreshed and with newly acquired abilities and interests. So, take time to share in a magically wonderful, joyful and restful summer. May you delight in ample free play throughout your family’s daily activities, and may each one of you find joy in discovering new expansive doors to freedom and love.

Dig It!

images-1Those of us in the Northern Hemisphere are heading into summer and many are looking forward to growing vegetables in their own gardens. In my state we have a Cooperative Extension Service that provides lots of information and offers activities about farming in my area. Since I’m in the city, I’ve started small this year with a few tomato plants in big pots, and some spinach and onions in a small bed. I look forward to my tiny harvest to make some spaghetti sauce! images

We know that the planet’s climate may change on its own, and we also know that humans do pollute the environment that can cause climate changes. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is one way of helping to limit climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced by growing your own food so that you don’t drive so often to the market. Many of you using the Oak Meadow curriculum are exploring types of soils in your science lessons. Here’s a fun game to play to try and maintain a sustainable farm that grows healthy crops and reduces emissions!

This website from the Smithsonian National Museum of History is awesome: Dig It! The Secrets of Soil.

Let us know:

What are some ways that you help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in your community?

The White House Student Film Festival

images-1

Have hopes for the future? Thoughts on how your generation will bring them to life? Love to make films – or ever just secretly wished to give it a shot? Well, this is your chance!

From now through July 15th, 2016, we’ll be accepting submissions for the third annual White House Student Film Festival. Our theme is “The World I Want To Live In” and we’re inviting U.S. students, grades K-12, to participate. Tell us what you hope the future will hold for us – sci-fi lasers? flying cars? yourself as President? – in the form of a short film. It can be fictional, animated, live-action documentary, or anything else you dream up. We’re just excited to see what you make! (From the White House Student Film Festival website.)

Please read the website and, if you are inspired, then participate! Go here to find out how.

Summertime and the Listening is Easy!

sync-logo

SYNC is once again offering free downloadable books for teens!

SYNC is a free summer audiobook program for teens 13+

The 2016 season is May 5th – August 17th 2016.
SYNC 2016 will give away 30 titles – two paired audiobook downloads a week!

Week 1 * Summer 2016

This summer’s theme is: “It’s the Circle of Life!”
The mystery of human evolution is looked at from very different points of view.
Download the free pair from SYNC »here.

This Week’s Audiobooks are:

Vivian Apple at the End of the World By Katie Coyle
Read by Julia Whelan
Published by Dreamscape Media
Great Tennessee Monkey Trial By Peter Goodchild
An L.A. Theatre Works full cast performance
Published by L.A. Theatre Works
Remember these titles will be replaced by a new pairing on 5/12/2016. Download the MP3 files, and then you can listen any time you want!
Thank you to Dreamscape Media and L.A. Theatre Works for generously providing this week’s titles.

Downloading Tips:
Get the OverDrive App to access free SYNC audiobooks. The app is available for every major desktop and mobile platform, including Windows, Mac, iPad, iPhone, Android phones and tablets, Kindle, NOOK, Windows 8 PC and tablet, Blackberry, and Windows Phone.

© 2016 * AudioFile Publications, Inc. * All Rights Reserved