10 Things to Do Before Your Homeschool Year Begins

Photo Credit: Ivey Family (Oak Meadow)

  1. Consider how your child has grown and changed since last year. What are they capable of now that would have been impossible last year? Think about last year’s homeschooling (or schooling) experience. What worked and what didn’t? Does your child need more or less of something this year? Do you need something to change this year?

    Photo Credit: Ivey Family
    (Oak Meadow)
  2. Make sure you have submitted any necessary paperwork to your state or province and received approval or a receipt if appropriate
  3. Organize and replenish your supplies. What sorts of things get used up fast in your house? How do you make those things readily available?
  4. Research, choose, and purchase your curriculum. Oak Meadow’s bookstore is a great place to start!
  5. Draft a daily rhythm. Consider it a starting point and be open to making changes in the early days and weeks of your school year. Make sure there is enough room for unstructured time each day.

    Photo Credit: Fischer Family
    (Oak Meadow)
  6. Investigate classes, activities, groups, and other activities. Research these things now; classes can fill up before the school year officially begins. Create a weekly schedule, considering how these options fit into your daily rhythm. Be sure to plan transition time and breathing room around activities.
  7. Plot out a yearly calendar. What seasons, holidays, themes will you engage with, and when? Where will you take “time off” from schooling, if that fits with your learning philosophy? Where do you need to focus more intensely on a holiday or other event? Where in the year will you take time to evaluate how things are working out?
  8. Make connections with other homeschoolers, or rekindle last year’s connections. If you don’t have other like-minded homeschoolers nearby, make connections online.

    Photo Credit: Fuller Family
    (Oak Meadow)
  9. Ask your children what they would like to get out of this upcoming year. Write it up and save it to revisit at the end of the year!
  10. Think about the ways in which you would like to grow as a parent, and consider what needs to happen to support your journey. We invest so much time and effort into our children’s experiences as homeschoolers; it is just as important to consider our own experiences and how we can have a healthy, happy homeschooling journey alongside our children.

THE AUGUST ECLIPSE!!

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Solar and Lunar Eclipses Worldwide

Hello! Here in New England we have had a good summer and it isn’t over yet! There are still weeks to go in August of lazy summer days and cool nights. Here at Oak Meadow one event we are all looking forward to is the upcoming eclipse on August 21, 2017. The following is a quick blast of great information from DeeDee Hughes, our Oak Meadow colleague:

Hi Folks,

We are all a little eclipse-crazy here in Corvallis, Oregon since we are in the “zone of totality” for viewing the total solar eclipse on August 21. I did some research and found this cool interactive map that shows the path of eclipses for years to come. I found a page where you can type in a city name and see what the eclipse will look like from there–I couldn’t resist checking out where friends and family members live. It’s fun to compare different places:  

Brattleboro VT

Santa Cruz CA

Corvallis OR

Seems like everyone in the country will be seeing something cool. Oh, and this article has good info about the solar eclipse glasses and how to tell if you have safe ones. 

I was wondering why the upcoming eclipse is being called “Eclipse of the Century” when they happen all the time, so I dug deeper. A total solar eclipse is different than an annular eclipse, but both have the moon lined up exactly in between Earth and the sun. In an annular eclipse, the moon moves fully in front of the sun but because the moon is further from the Earth at that time, there will be a “ring of fire” seen around the moon, rather than having the moon block the sun entirely the way it does in a total solar eclipse. The difference between an annular and a total solar eclipse is the distance between the moon and Earth. Here’s an article with a cool “ring of fire” photo. 

That’s my two cents on cool eclipse fun! DD

I’ll also add that EARTHSKY has a very good “Eclipse Day” checklist for getting ready for viewing. Be prepared, have fun, and enjoy the “Eclipse of the Century” with family and friends!

 

9 Questions to Ask Yourself As You Consider Homeschooling

Photo Credit: Robyn Groth Oak Meadow Archives

  1. Why does homeschooling feel like a good idea? What needs are not being met well in other ways, and how might homeschooling help best meet those needs?
  2. What is my child expecting homeschooling to be like? What am I expecting homeschooling to be like? How do those two things line up?
  3. What areas of learning are easiest for my child? What areas are most challenging?
  4. What are my child’s passions and interests? How will they fit into our plan for homeschooling?
  5. What are my biggest worries about homeschooling? What are some strategies I could use to work through those things if they happen?
  6. What struggles do I predict we might have as we add homeschooling to our parent-child dynamic, and how can I anticipate and prevent them?
  7. How will I meet my own need for self-care so that I am able to give all that my child needs?
  8. What will I say to family, friends, neighbors, or strangers who are skeptical about our decision to homeschool? How will I prepare myself for such questions?
  9. Who are my homeschooling support buddies? Do I have friends, neighbors, or relatives who homeschool? If not, do I know where to find local and/ or distant homeschoolers to share experiences and ideas with?

Finding Nature in the City

Photo Credit: Julie Tower-Pierce
(Oak Meadow)

If you live in an urban area where nature is elusive, don’t assume that there’s no nature to be found! Go for a walk with your eyes wide open and see how many signs of nature you can “collect” along the way. Take photos or make sketches so that you will have a record and can try to identify plants, insects, and anything else once you are home.

(four kids on scooters in city)
Photo Credit: Julie Tower-Pierce
(Oak Meadow)

First off, cultivate a healthy relationship with the sun. If there are few trees to offer a shade canopy, a hat is a good idea. If you are surrounded by pavement and cement, the sun’s rays can reflect uncomfortably up as you walk. If you start feeling uncomfortable in the glare or the heat, stop in shady spots along the way. If there is no shade, use an umbrella to carry some shade around with you.

Can you find bits of moss or stray plants growing in a sidewalk crack? Look up at the sides of buildings and out along fences, retaining walls, train tracks, etc.. What types of plants seem to like to grow in different places?

Did you know that weeds can have flowers, pods, or seeds? Review the life cycle of a plant and see if you can find plants at various stages of the life cycle.

(small girl holding up two green leaves)
Photo Credit: Van Kleeck Family
(Oak Meadow)

Look up! The sky and the clouds are part of nature. There are often birds in urban areas. What might attract birds to your city? Where do you think they nest? Can you spot any nests?

When it rains, what happens to the water? Go outside and trace its path from the roof to the storm drain. Where does it go from there?

Is there a river in your city? Are there any signs of nature in or around the river? Some urban rivers are polluted, but some have been cleaned up by thoughtful, committed citizens. How healthy is your city’s river, if you have one?

One of the most impressive things about finding nature in urban settings is the number of plants that seem to be growing against all odds. What is the most unlikely place that you’ve found a plant surviving or even thriving?

(adult handing monarch butterfly to child)
Photo Credit: Cindy Wallach
(Oak Meadow)

See if you discover any rooftop or community gardens. What do you see growing there? Many city dwellers use containers to plant vegetables, herbs, flowers, and even tall trees. What can you find growing in containers in your city?

Is there a park, picnic area, or playground nearby with natural features? Can you tell which plants were placed there by humans and which ones moved in on their own? What are the clues that inform your answer?

How far would you need to travel to visit a nature preserve, public garden, or national park? What would you find there that you can or cannot find at home?

(child doing bark rubbing on tree with beeswax crayon)
Photo Credit: Lynn Nash
(Oak Meadow)

In what ways do humans intentionally help to encourage nature to grow and thrive in urban areas? And how do we unintentionally support certain kinds of plants or animals? What things could you and your family do to invite nature into your home life?

While walking, did you encounter any plants or animals that you had never seen before? Look them up and get to know them! They are your neighbors, too. Next time you go outside and see them, you can identify them by name.

Find out whether there are any groups or initiatives promoting nature in your city. You might be able to meet some people who are also interested in exploring nature in an urban setting.

Nature exists all around us, sometimes against the odds or in surprising places. Even if you have no backyard and your neighborhood is more gray than green, chances are good that you can find a bit of nature to enjoy. Try it and let us know what you find!

10 Reminders for the End of the Homeschool Year

Photo Credit: Kara Maynard (Oak Meadow)

  1. Take it slow. Resist the urge to speed things up, even if others around you seem to be doubletiming things trying get to summer faster. Even homeschoolers can get a little end-of-the-school-year-itis. Build in some cool, fun activities to balance things out and allow the summer season to unfold when it is ready.
  2. Photo Credit: Ledahl Family
    (Oak Meadow)

    Be flexible. If your homeschooling workload is holding up the start of summer fun for your family, maybe it’s time to revisit your plan and adjust things a bit so that summer doesn’t have to wait until everything is done. You might stretch lessons out over more days to make more time for play, or see if any nonessentials can be cut. The flexibility of home learning can’t be beat!

  3. Reflect on what went well this past year and what you’d like to do differently going forward. How did each person in your family grow this year? What sorts of things were accomplished? What is each person most proud of? What felt like it could have gone better? Take notes so you can remember and incorporate that feedback when planning for next year.
  4. Tidy up your homeschool supplies. Leave them neat and organized so you won’t have to go looking for them in the fall. Retire any supplies that have reached the end of their useful life, and make a list of what needs to be replenished. But don’t pack everything away completely — you never know when your child might suddenly have a creative need for something in that stash!

    Photo Credit: Bessent Family
    (Oak Meadow)
  5. Stay on top of requirements. If your state or district requires an end-of-year assessment, test, or portfolio, plan ahead so you will meet the deadline. Don’t leave it to the last minute. If things are jumbled and hard to sort through, now is a great time to make a plan for staying organized next year.
  6. Consider making a portfolio with a few representative pieces and/or photos of each student’s work even if your state or district doesn’t require it. Store portfolios together in a waterproof container so you can enjoy looking back on them in future years.
  7. Dream big! What would you and your family most like to explore together in the coming years? Brainstorm all of the things that come to mind. You may not be able to do all of them, but it’s fun to think about possibilities.
  8. Do you still need to submit next year’s enrollment forms to your state, district, charter, or distance learning school? Do you know the deadlines and requirements? Do it now, or at least get forms and information in order so you won’t have to hunt for it when the time comes.

    Photo Credit: Kara Maynard
    (Oak Meadow)
  9. Write your future self a letter. When autumn comes, you might find that your school-year memories have been overwritten with thoughts of summer fun. Have everyone person in the family write or dictate a friendly letter to themselves to open at the start of the next school year. Say something in your letter about what you want most to remember about the past year, along with your dreams for the coming year. You might forget the details over the summer, but those letters will remind you!
  10. Celebrate! A year of homeschooling is a milestone worth celebrating. Here are 10 Ideas for Making the End of the Year Special and some more ideas from Oak Meadow teachers about Celebrating the School Year.

 

Stamp Collecting!

“The word ‘philatelist’ means a person who practices philately or stamp collecting. It comes from the French word ‘philatelie’, which was derived from the Greek words ‘philos’, meaning loving, and ‘atelia’, meaning exemption from tax which also came to mean ‘postage is prepaid.’.”

American Philatelic Society

The American Philatelic Society is the largest, nonprofit organization in the world for stamp collectors.

When I was little and traveled with my family, we didn’t have computers for emailing and so we wrote lots of letters to family and friends. We also made a tradition of mailing ourselves letters to our own home! We would go to a post office in a country or town that we were visiting, and purchase a special stamp. (You can ask the post master to show you what stamps he/she has available.) Then, using the stamp, we would mail the letter home to ourselves. It was fun to see the letters and the stamps when we arrived home. I don’t have a very big collection of stamps, but the ones that I do have hold some wonderful memories for me.

This year a really cool stamp is going to be offered! A first of its kind! Some background first:

You may have read that there is going to be a total eclipse of the sun across the United States this summer. (Monday, August 21, 2017.) People from all over the world will be coming to different spots in the United States to witness this solar eclipse.

Solar Eclipse
Photo Credit: Public Domain

What does a solar eclipse have to do with a stamp? Well, the Postal Service will be offering a first-of-its-kind stamp! It changes when you touch it! The Postal Service announcement says: “The Total Eclipse of the Sun, Forever® stamp, which commemorates the August 21 eclipse, transforms into an image of the Moon from the heat of a finger.”

You can read the story of how the stamp was designed here.

If you would like to view other stamps that have commemorated eclipses, you can view them here.

So, as you travel to new places, or even stay in your hometown, take a look at the many stamps that the post office has to offer!

P. S.  Looking directly at the sun during a solar eclipse can be dangerous; here’s a way to enjoy the eclipse without hurting your eyes: http://hilaroad.com/camp/projects/eclipse_viewer/eclipse_viewer.html

 

National Get Outdoors Day

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.” Rachel Carlson On Saturday, June 10th, the Defenders of Wildlife organization will celebrate their 10th annual National Get … Continue reading "National Get Outdoors Day"

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.”

Rachel Carlson

On Saturday, June 10th, the Defenders of Wildlife organization will celebrate their 10th annual National Get Outdoors Day. This national event encourages families to go outside, visit a park or refuge, and renew a personal connection to nature, as well as regenerate a commitment to leaving a healthy planet for future generations. There’s nothing better than introducing your children to the wonders of nature, especially since it’s only a matter of time before the future rests in their hands. Here is a list of all 198 National Get Outdoors Day locations. There might be one near you!

“What do parents owe their young that is more important than a warm and trusting connection to the Earth…?”

– Theodore Roszak, The Voice of the Earth

Every grade level in Oak Meadow’s k-4 coursework suggests environmental awareness activities and exercises. We also feel it’s important to introduce and teach young children about the natural environment. So, go ahead! Make summer plans, get outdoors, and let Nature be your teacher!

“As a child, one has that magical capacity to move among the many eras of the earth; to see the land as an animal does; to experience the sky from the perspective of a flower or a bee; to feel the earth quiver and breathe beneath us; to know a hundred different smells of mud and listen unselfconsciously to the soughing of the trees.”

-Valerie Andrews, A Passion for this Earth

 

Celebrating the School Year – Part Two

Read Part One of this article here.

The US Memorial Day holiday has now passed, and I hope everyone who celebrated enjoyed a safe and happy weekend. Those of us who are adding the finishing touches to the end of the school year are now back to focusing on a productive, successful and positive conclusion of the coursework, as well as beginning new adventures throughout the season of summer.

Last week, I shared ideas for completing the school year. Regarding a successful end to the school year, this is what I tell my k-6 home teachers: It is very important that you and your children take the final week to fully embrace the magic of the school year. It is an opportunity to celebrate all that has been learned and accomplished. How you complete the school year will carry you and your children into the new school year, so PLEASE finish the school year on a positive note! You will feel much self-gratitude in doing it this way, and so will your children.

This Part Two blog includes ideas from other Oak Meadow teachers. Enjoy what they have to share!

Lesley Arnold: I second Leslie’s advice and would also add that reading over the teacher’s comments for the year brings to light all the progress that has been made throughout the year. Reading a writing assignment from the beginning of the year and then reading one from the end of the year is great to do! “Reliving” books read over the course of the year is also a fun activity.

Sarah Antel: All wonderful ideas! Going through the MLB and picking out favorite pieces to share at a “show” for relatives could be fun too. They could make it a special event with finger sandwiches and lemonade perhaps!

Andy Kilroy: I used Oak Meadow Kindergarten curriculum to home school my granddaughter Julia for one year. It was a delightful and eye opening experience for me, after teaching 30 years in a brick and mortar setting. At the end of the year, Julia and I made up a song and dance to celebrate her work. She had such a sense of accomplishment when she finished and she loved writing poems, so this seemed like a fitting end to all her hard work. The song was about her accomplishments – learning the ABCs, learning numbers, learning to love nature, and of course, her special tree!

Michelle Menegaz: We have had a share day with a few close and trusted, appreciative, sensitive friends who homeschool in the same way we do. We lay out the main lesson books or other written work, display any art, have a few physical activities from the year (writing with one’s toes, trying some balance activities, putting on togas, some years a background slideshow of photos from the year, solving a puzzle related to lessons, a simple science activity, etc.), maybe share music but not performance style, and often have a cookout campfire or picnic. Very low key but I feel, even though it is sometimes a bit hard to be “the center of attention”, it is important for homeschoolers to be celebrated – especially not just by their parents, if possible. And besides, I am proud of MY work as the teacher, too, and yes, it feels good to have that recognized. Most years this feels impossible to pull off and I really have to grab myself by the bootstraps and try. It is always worth it.

Last year we had our weekly homeschool group here to practice donning togas, eat Greek food, and play the VT version of Olympic games…the fire log throw, the long driveway jump, clown fake fighting instead of wrestling, something with the sprinkler, making Heracles Knot bracelets out of copper wire, cooking on a campfire, and trying NOT to reread all the Rick Riordan books about ancient Greek mythological figures! We let the kids run the show for the most part while we sat back and ate hummus and celery and basked in the glow.

Gwendolyn Trumbull: I have a 6th grade student who had a similar fun end of the year event with her family and grandparents. She hung samples of her work throughout the house, made and served food from all the different countries she had studied and set up and played games from ancient cultures for all to try. She and the family were blown away by how much she had produced and learned. The party and reflection made her feel very proud and accomplished – which she certainly should have.

Last week, I recommended reading Amanda Witman’s post on “10 Ideas for Making the End of the Year Special”. This week, I also encourage you to read “14 Tips for Surviving the Summer With Kids From Homeschooling Parents”

Happy Summer!

A Day to Remember: Memorial Day

Memorial Day, celebrated in the United States on the last Monday of May, is a day in which we honor those men and women (and service dogs) that died while serving the country in the United States armed services.

The day actually started as a way to commemorate those that died during the U.S. Civil War. In 1868 it was established and it was called “Decoration Day.” At that time it was on May 30th and was a day to decorate the graves of those that died in the Civil War.

In 1967 Memorial Day became a national holiday. In 1971 the holiday was moved to the last Monday in May. On the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs website, it states: “In December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed, and the president signed into law, “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance.”

The law actually requires that U.S. citizens pause, for one minute at 3:00 p.m. on Memorial Day, and honor those that have died in service to our country.

 

Celebrating the School Year – Part One

Memorial Day was first established as a United States holiday for remembering the people who died while serving in the country’s armed forces. It is also a benchmark for the end of another school year and the beginning of summer break – not only the US, but also for countries in Europe, Asia, and South America. The reasons for summer vacation has changed and evolved throughout history, yet the more popular 180 day, 9-month calendar was firmly established and has been mainly utilized since the beginning of the twentieth century.

Oak Meadow honors enrollment periods year-round; however, most families still follow the normal schedule of beginning school in August or September and completing the school year by May or June. This means that many Oak Meadow families are currently in the process of completing the final lessons and preparing for a long summer break.

The end of the school year can often be a time of exhaustion for both the student and the home teacher.  It is very important that you and your children take the final week to fully embrace the magic of the school year. It is an opportunity to celebrate all that has been learned and accomplished. How you complete the school year will carry you and your children into the new school year, so PLEASE finish the school year on a positive note! You will feel much self-gratitude in doing it this way, and so will your children.

Photo Credit: Leslie Ann Daniels

One of my favorite ways to celebrate the end of the school year is by decorating my home with fresh garden flowers, performing a student play for family and friends, singing favorite songs learned throughout the school year, viewing the main lesson books, and making special treats. This year, my strawberries were ripe at the completion of the school year, so we made star-shaped fruit cookies. We used our favorite traditional whole-wheat sugar cookie recipe, spread the cookies with cream cheese icing, and decorated them with our favorite fruit. Be sure to include your children in the preparations of the festivities for it makes it extra special and exciting to share the success of their school year.

Last year, our main Oak Meadow blogger, Amanda Witman, posted a very helpful article on “10 Ideas for Making the End of the Year Special”. It includes many wonderful ways to conclude an industrious and productive school year.

Read Part Two of this article here.

http://oakmeadowblogs.com/blog/2016/06/12/10-ideas-for-making-the-end-of-the-year-special/